The Vanquished

The Vanquished

Typically, I have an aversion to footnotes. Unless, of course, we're talking about Whitehead, who famously commented that the entire history of Western philosophy "consists of a series of footnotes to Plato". That broadens the conversation, considerably. 

Well, Alphonso Lingis is an exception to the footnote rule, on many fronts, not least of which because we're dedicating our first issue of Singularum to his work. In his new book, "Violence and Splendor", which is a must read, Lingis writes on Antony Gormley, in an exposition of 'Inner Space'.

In the footnote to this chapter, (which, in many respects, predates blog posts by decades) Lingis writes: "Gormley said that Rodin's first publicly exhibited work, The Age of Bronze (depicted above) exhibited the inner space of the body". Also known as, The Vanquished, and modeled in 1876, the sculpture "shows the model, exhausted by the year of posing, turned inward in an awareness of the inner space of his body."

Here's Gormley: "Sculpture...is a small and inert catalyst, a bit of matter used to catalyze your sense of being immersed in light and matter. Through the work you may become aware of the breath passing through the channels of your noes, or the weight running through your knees. Aware of the world that you inhabit and your aliveness within."